• Solo Show At Cerulean Art Gallery

    Solo Show At Cerulean Art Gallery

    5 Artists in 5 Galleries At Cerulean Collective

  • The M.A. Post Award at Fame 2017

    The M.A. Post Award at Fame 2017
  • Fame 2017, Fellowship of PAFA, Won the The M. A. Post Award

    Fame 2017, Fellowship of PAFA, Won the The M. A. Post Award

    The FELLOWSHIP of the PENNSYLVANIA ACADEMY of the FINE ARTS and
    The PAFA ALUMNI GALLERY

    PRESENT
    FAME 2017
    The Fellowship Annual Members Exhibition

    Exhibition Dates: TUESDAY August 1 through SUNDAY September 10 Opening Reception on SUNDAY, August 6, 2017 from 2 to 5PM
    PAFA Alumni Gallery, Historic Landmark Building 118 N. Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102
    http://www.pafa.org/ 610-649-5694

    2017 FAME JUROR
    We are delighted that the 2017 FAME Juror for both exhibition and awards selection is: Kirstin M. Jensen, Chief Curator James A. Michener Art Museum

  • Biggs Museum Of American Art

    Biggs Museum Of American Art

    Biggs Picture 2017
    June 2 – July 23, 2017
    My work will be shown at this Juried Show at BMOAA
    Once every three years, the Biggs Museum hosts this juried, regional competition. Artists from throughout the Mid-Atlantic states are invited to compete within this unique exhibition featuring a wide variety of landscape concepts in any artistic medium: photography, sculpture, painting, video, installation, etc. The works will be available for purchase.
    http://www.biggsmuseum.org/exhibitions/

  • Spring Gala Exhibition & Fundraiser 2017 April 30 – June 3, 2017

    Spring Gala Exhibition & Fundraiser 2017 April 30 – June 3, 2017

    Blues 1, 30x30, Acrylic
    https://www.mainlineart.org/events/event/spring-gala-exhibition-2017/

  • https://vindevie.me/2016/09/08/the-generations-entwined-the-modernist-legacy-of-arthur-b-carles/

    Inner Scape 1, 2016, mixed media. Kassem Amoudi, born 1951, American born Jordan.

    The artist says that beauty ‘may be hidden in a slight hint of color at the edge of the canvas or it may become the main attraction.’

    As Duchamp knew well from the rigours of his French academic training, it happens that beauty may also be called up by our associations in memory, emotional or intellectual, of the colors in a canvas.

    Here are several of Matisse’s 1911-1912 Moroccan blues. Floating sky and the heat which shimmers in a very hot climate.

    This recall adds to the mystery of this painting as both a place inside us and outside in the world. I like this work for itself and I like it for Matisse in memory.

  • Studio Faculty Exhibition, Part 1: Spotlight on Abstraction 02/18/201705/28/2017 Open House  Thursday, February 23 , 5:30–7:00 p.m.

    Studio Faculty Exhibition, Part 1: Spotlight on Abstraction 02/18/201705/28/2017 Open House  Thursday, February 23 , 5:30–7:00 p.m.
  • Arthur B. Carles and His Expanding Circle: An Exhibition in Honor of Frances M. Maguire

    Arthur B. Carles and His Expanding Circle: An Exhibition in Honor of Frances M. Maguire

    https://woodmereartmuseum.org/experience/exhibitions/arthur-b-carles-and-his-expanding-circle-an-exhibition-in-honor-of-frances-m-maguire

    https://vindevie.me/2016/09/08/the-generations-entwined-the-modernist-legacy-of-arthur-b-carles/

  • A More Perfect Union. Power Sex and Race In The Representaion Of Couples

    A More Perfect Union. Power Sex and Race In The Representaion Of Couples


    The Song of the Reed, 2006-16, acrylic. Kassem Amoudi, American born Jordan, 1951.



    Of the three, it is the physical world which is the essential precondition of our lives.

    A common and garden truth which the evolution of our consciousness, the supremacy of our species with its immense ego and imagination, the extreme rationality of our Western intellectual tradition with its addiction to ideas, have obfuscated. Not to speak of some of our major religions which want to assuage our fear of dying by pointing to other worlds in which we will live.

    No body, no life. To our rational knowledge, only one life here on earth.



    It follows that, first and foremost, we need to reconcile our flesh to the physical world as it is. Not submit our flesh, but reconcile it: struggles are involved.

    The world is not made in any of our images and the reconciliation – again, I am not talking about submission – of the flesh to the world is the essential precondition of a realized life and of a mature society.

    Without this effort, no expanding liberty, no expanding justice or welfare. And all three are the promise of our Western civilization.



    We ride on and have our roots and anchor in, take our entire sustenance from, and derive the energy, shape, intensity, beauty, efficacity, sorrow, difficulty, force and joy of our lives from the reconciliation of our flesh to the physical world.



    This project of reconciliation is our spiritual life; and our spiritual life does not exist except in our physical interactions with other people and in our behavior towards all things living.

    We can see all around how far we have yet to go. This is the urgency to which the contemporary artists in this exhibition are pointing.
    The reed, the artist says, is the reed cut, according to the story by the Sufi mystic, Jalal al-Din Rumi (1207-1273) from a bed of reeds to make a flute whose plaintive sound is an expression of its sadness at separation from the native ground of its being.

    We, says Rumi, are those reeds.



    Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, says Rumi

    there is a field. I’ll meet you there.

    When the soul lies down in that grass,

    the world is too full to talk about.

    Ideas, language, even the phrase ‘each other’ doesn’t make any sense.

    Translation by Coleman Barks, American poet, born 1937.


    This painting is not, in the first instance, about physical intimacy or love. It is pointing to the spiritual function of the work of reconciling our flesh to the world, to other people, to the earth. Human love, for this mystic, as for all others, is a reflection of human need for identification with the source of the life of our world. The practice of love for anything or anyone is one of the main ways in which we reconcile our flesh to the world.

    That it is irregular to hear discussion of this does not mean that this is not true. It means only that we are seculars and don’t habitually use this language.



    One of the primary areas in which we struggle with this reconciliation is in our intimate lives.

    It goes without saying that all human experience tracks through the body and leaves there its marks, its consequences, for good or ill.

    What Woodmere is showing is just this: our energy, our shapes, our intensity, beauty, efficacy, sorrow, difficulty, joy and force in the area of our intimate relationships.

    That is, in the reconciliation of our flesh to the world as it is in its diversity.

    In the absence of our continuous efforts to reconcile ourselves, we will regress.

    We are afraid that our civilization, which has well-known original sins because whole categories of people were excluded from the Constitution of 1787, has begun regressing.

    This is a remarkable exhibition, conceived both with intelligence and passion. And timely.

    For which I thank the artist, Frank Bramblett, 1947 – 2015, and the director of The Woodmere, Bill Valerio.

    https://vindevie.me/2017/02/20/the-reconciliation-of-the-flesh-woodmere-museum-questions-our-more-perfect-union/